Bolivia suspended the license of a tiny charter airline whose plane crashed in Colombia this week after apparently running out of fuel, killing 71 people and wiping out a Brazilian soccer team on its way to a regional cup final.

Bolivian authorities said they were suspending LAMIA's operating license and replacing the management of its aviation authority to ensure a transparent investigation. It said that neither decision implied wrongdoing.

Investigators combing the crash site on a wooded hillside outside of Medellin found no traces of fuel in the wreckage of the BAe 146 made by Britain's BAE Systems Plc, signaling that the crash may have resulted from lack of fuel.

International flight regulations require aircraft to carry enough reserve fuel to fly for 30 minutes after reaching their destination.

"In this case, sadly, the aircraft did not have enough fuel to meet the regulations for contingency," said Freddy Bonilla, secretary of airline security at Colombia's aviation authority.

A crackling recording obtained by Colombian media of Bolivian pilot Miguel Quiroga's final words showed he told the control tower at Medellin's airport that the plane was "in total failure, total electrical failure, without fuel."

He requested urgent permission to land, and then the audio went silent.

Monday night's disaster sent shock waves across the global soccer community and plunged Brazil, Latin America's largest nation, into mourning. The small Chapecoense team was traveling on a charter flight operated by airline LAMIA Bolivia to the biggest game in its history, the final of the Copa Sudamericana.

For the U.S News, President-elect Donald Trump warned on Thursday that U.S. companies would face "consequences" for outsourcing jobs abroad, as he touted his early success in persuading an air conditioner maker to keep about 1,000 jobs in the United States rather than move them to Mexico.

"Companies are not going to leave the United States anymore without consequences. Not going to happen," the Republican said on a visit to a Carrier Corp plant in Indianapolis.

Trump, who takes office on Jan. 20, did not say what the consequences would be, but he frequently threatened during the election campaign that his administration would put a 35 percent import tariff on goods made by American manufacturers that moved jobs offshore.

It is unclear what steps would have to be taken by federal authorities before Trump could retaliate against individual companies shifting jobs abroad.

Trump also did not address whether Carrier's parent company, United Technologies (UTX.N), would face any consequences for continuing with plans to move 1,300 other Indiana jobs to Mexico.

Trump made keeping jobs in the United States one of the main issues of his campaign and frequently pilloried Carrier for planning to move production to Mexico as he appealed to blue-collar voters in the Midwest.

 

 

For the Science News, an unmanned Russian cargo ship loaded with more than 2-1/2 tons of food and supplies for the International Space Station broke apart about six minutes after liftoff on Thursday, December 1, Russia's space agency Roscosmos said in a statement.

A Soyuz rocket carrying the Progress capsule blasted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan as planned at 9:51 a.m. EST.

Ground control teams then lost radio contact with the rocket and most of the spacecraft fragments burned in the dense atmosphere.

The capsule was last confirmed flying at an altitude of about 190 km (118 miles) over the remote and unpopulated area of the Republic of Tyva.

The six-member crew aboard the International Space Station is not in any danger and has enough supplies for several months, NASA said.

The cause of the accident is under investigation. Thursday’s launch was the fourth failed cargo run to the station in the past two years, including one previous Progress failure.